‘The Fight for Dolores’ – August Free Book Promotion

I am really pleased that ‘The Fight for Dolores,’ my short contemporary romance set in rural Ireland, has had it’s first review on Amazon.com:

Looking for something quick to pass a bit of time?  This could be it.  A sweet, cute, short story,” (4 stars).

‘The Fight for Dolores’ and the longer contemporary romance, ‘The Laird’s Right-Hand Lady’, will both be free on Kindle 24th thru 28th August, and both are available on Kindle Unlimited.

Bookangel’s Review of ‘Miss Millie’s Groom’

I am so delighted with Bookangel’s very thorough review of ‘Miss Millie’s Groom,’ my romance set during the First World War.  Here’s an excerpt:

‘I’m glad to say this is one of the few  [books]  where the lead character does grow and learn throughout the story. The characters come across well and are consistent in what they are doing with all their flaws intact. This makes for a more interesting read as, to begin with, Millicent’s youth and inexperience are obvious, while those around her act in a more realistic manner. The setting around the war provides a solid backdrop to the events and helps to provide an interesting set of circumstances and situations to be overcome.

As a romance, it ticks all the right boxes, and it’s a pleasure to see it come with a well-written story behind it. Readers looking for a HEA will certainly enjoy it,’ (4-star review, Bookangel.co.uk).

And here’s the full review:

http://bookangel.co.uk/review/miss-millies-groom/

Many thanks to Bookangel for their continued support to indie authors in the UK!

‘Miss Millie’s Groom’ Free on Smashwords

‘Miss Millie’s Groom’ book cover

My World War One romance, ‘Miss Millie’s Groom,’ is newly-published on Smashwords and is currently free from the site and from its retailers:

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/710062

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/miss-millies-groom-catherine-e-chapman/1125994767

http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/miss-millies-groom/id1216270283

http://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/miss-millie-s-groom

I am delighted that the book recently received its first rating on Barnes & Noble and it’s 5 stars!  Here’s an extract from the review of the book that appeared on the Romantic Historical Reviews website in November 2016:

“Millicent is vivacious, endearing and determined. I truly enjoyed her character a great deal from the first page to the last. She reminded me of Sybil from Downton Abbey; in fact, this novel has other overtones from that drama.”

‘The Hangar Dance’ reviewed by Book Angel

I’m delighted that Book Angel recently reviewed my WWII romance, ‘The Hangar Dance,’ and published the review in a newspaper circulated in Croydon.  Many thanks to them for their commitment to promoting indie authors.

http://bookangel.co.uk/blog/the-hangar-dance/

Review of Charlotte Bronte’s ‘Shirley’

Review of 'Shirley' by Charlotte Bronte

Review of ‘Shirley’ by Charlotte Bronte

New Year brings a renewed dedication to reviewing books I’ve been reading.  I finished Charlotte Bronte’s ‘Shirley’ a couple of months back, but have finally got around to writing a review.  Here it is:

I feel a strong sense of relief at having discovered Shirley.  I consider myself a fan of Charlotte Bronte but have in the past abandoned her novel The Professor and found Villette hard-going (though ultimately rewarding).

Shirley is certainly not ‘standard’ Charlotte Bronte.  It reads a lot more like a George Eliot (or even Charles Dickens) novel, in being a work which is much more socially aware than Jane Eyre, with a larger cast of characters.  In contrast with Jane Eyre, the book has a third person narrator, which brings it more in line with the standard model for the Nineteenth Century novel.  Also significant is the fact that it’s her only novel to really transcend her abiding obsession with the lot of a female governess – although, latterly, a male tutor does become a significant character.

But I found it refreshing to read heroines who were not as doom-laden and self-absorbed as Lucy Snowe (Villette).  Whilst Caroline is a more sensitive character, more akin to what we expect from Bronte, the feisty Shirley herself defies our expectations and, for me, this was one of the greatest revelations of the novel.

I found the first 100 pages (one-fifth) of the book rather arduous (although, it’s here that there is social scene-setting that is interestingly atypical of Bronte) but it’s necessary for what follows.  Whilst I acknowledge that Shirley is Bronte’s most ambitious novel in terms of providing a commentary on the society of early Nineteenth Century Britain, I found it most rewarding as the story of a love triangle and, when this strand of the plot develops later on in the book, I believe it becomes a much more compelling read.  We also see in this storyline CB writing with emotional depth to challenge Jane Eyre.

So it’s for this aspect of Shirley that I would recommend the book to any fan of CB’s writing.  But I would also say that, if you’re a fan of the Nineteenth Century novel but not a fan of Jane Eyre, I would give Shirley a go – it shows a very different side to Charlotte Bronte’s writing.

Happy New Year to everyone!