Bookshelf Adventures’ Review of ‘Art & Grace’

Many thanks to Julie of Bookshelf Adventures, for her very thoughtful review of ‘Art & Grace.’

Art & Grace Review on Bookshelf Adventures

The book is available digitally and in print from Amazon and is still free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers.

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Kindle Countdown Deal – ‘Art & Grace’

‘Art & Grace’ on Kindle Countdown

I’m running a Kindle Countdown deal for ‘Art & Grace,’ from 22nd to 29th August.  During that period the book will be 99c / 99p, rather than its usual price of $2.99.

http://www.amazon.com/Art-Grace-Catherine-Chapman-ebook/dp/B07V7FYML8/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Art-Grace-Catherine-Chapman-ebook/dp/B07V7FYML8/

“This is not your normal Regency novel; it’s something different. Well-written, with plenty to love throughout, it’s a story that will have you hooked,” (Bibliophile Ramblings).

‘Art & Grace’ – Newly-published on Kindle

‘Art & Grace’ now on Kindle

I’m delighted to report that, ‘Art & Grace,’ my novel set in Regency England, is now available on Amazon and enrolled in Kindle Unlimited.

http://www.amazon.com/Art-Grace-Catherine-Chapman-ebook/dp/B07V7FYML8/

Here’s the blurb:

Bristol, England, in the early Nineteenth Century. The slave trade has been abolished but slavery itself has not yet been outlawed.

Bess, a young woman of mixed heritage, has an ambiguous position in the home of the once-eminent Liston family. Raised and educated alongside the family’s children, Richard and Artemisia, she has been increasingly confined to the role of a domestic servant since the death of Joshua Liston, the household’s head.

When Richard Liston instigates an introduction between Captain Adam Bryce, a Royal Naval officer of repute, and his sister, Artemisia, Adam shows greater interest in Bess. Pressed by Artemisia to stalk Adam, Bess’s problems begin. And when the ailing matriarch, Elizabeth Liston, presents Bess with an impossible choice, the weaving of a web of deceit commences that will ultimately push Bess and Artemisia’s friendship to the brink.

As the scene shifts to rural Somerset, things are far from serene: Sebastian Weston, occupant of the grand Milton Abbey, means to hold both Bess and Artemisia in his thrall. Rivalries ensue, the bond between Artemisia and Bess being strained by their allegiances to the men in their lives.

Charting the turbulent waters of family commitments and amorous liaisons, it’s hard to fathom who to trust and whom to love.

 

‘Brizecombe Hall’ – Short Victorian Romance Free on Kindle

‘Brizecombe Hall’ – Short Victorian Romance currently free

Since Valentine’s Day, ‘Brizecombe Hall,’ my short Governess romance, set in early Victorian England, has been free on Kindle in the UK and I’m delighted to report that it’s currently topping the charts for free women’s historical fiction and Victorian romance:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brizecombe-Hall-Catherine-Chapman-ebook/dp/B008GSXHFS/

The story is also currently available free from Smashwords and their retailers:

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/75187

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/brizecombe-hall-catherine-chapman/1104561332

If you read and enjoy ‘Brizecombe Hall,’ I’d appreciate reviews, ratings and recommendations on Amazon and elsewhere.

My Review of ‘Sal’ by Mick Kitson

Since it’s World Book Day, I thought it would be good for the soul to write a review of a book I recently read and thoroughly enjoyed.  Sal, by Mick Kitson, is newly-published on Amazon.

It’s difficult to broach the main theme of this book without giving too much away. Suffice to say that Sal commits the most serious of crimes and yet has the reader’s full sympathy. The book explores the extents to which Sal goes in the name of sisterly love but the most poignant aspect of the narrative is her endless support of her errant mother. A strong tension is created in that Sal’s stark recounting of events leaves the reader feeling far less sympathetic towards Maw.

I loved this book. It wasn’t for the fine detailing of Sal and Peppa’s time in the wilderness but for the compelling nature of the underlying story that Sal is telling throughout. The classic adventure stories that are referenced in the book are, superficially, the model for what this story itself is, but, at a deeper level, Sal leaves us questioning the society in which we live today.